Smartphones, Tablets: Mobile devices are becoming more and more important for brand management and more are added, such as SmartWatch and wearables. The development of Smart Living will also support the further expansion that we see in Mobile Health.

Mobile branding is brand management with mobile devices. The user can communicate at any time (24/7), and any place: Mobile devices accompany the user through his day – in the train, in the lecture, even in the bathroom. In contrast to laptop and PC, the smartphone is almost always present in everyday life, usually switched on and connected to the Internet. Another unique feature is that we can offer the user personalized content that suits his wishes, needs, and situation.

Location Based Branding

Location-based branding is location-based brand management. Example: The user is in a real place, where he enters and participates in a brand story. He has to do something, or he lets something happen. Very well this can be combined with augmented reality. So let’s go: allow your user to hand-me-downs through your business, navigate to specific locations, and complete tasks to receive a discount as a reward.

Tell stories in your storefront, possibly supported by an avatar, an electronic helper. At the Open House, mobile stories in the foyer tell the story of the company’s founding, in the research lab of the latest product, in the production of the outstanding quality of this product. With micro telling short stories in two to three sentences or 140 characters texts.

Situation-Based Branding

The challenge for mobile branding is to gain knowledge about the users in certain situations and the experiences that they would like to have in this situation. So far, market research relies on measurable behavior such as click counts and retention times in eShops.

Although these data provide important information on the observed behavior: Which banner is clicked more often? How long do users need to order a product? But there is some lack of insight about why people act in situations and whether they will do so again in the future.

This requires qualitative, “understanding” information about the situation. The first approaches already exist: the users are recorded and evaluated via the webcam: Does the user feel bored? Is he excited? Our stories could instantly instigate or reassure him.

Conclusion

Mobile branding and location-based branding contribute to digital branding through unlimited availability of time and place. However, we should better understand how the user feels in certain situations and what he wants.